Along with the scientific name of American Beautyberry, know the scientific names of other plants too. New York.
Spanish: filigrana (Cuba) French: callicarpe d'Amérique; porphyra; Local Common Names. Callicarpa americana L. Preferred Common Name. Spanish: filigrana (Cuba) French: callicarpe d'Amérique; porphyra; Local Common Names. Preferred Scientific Name.

The relatively insignificant flowers develop into prolific bright violet to magenta berry-like drupes which encircle the stem. It can grow wild. The family name is Verbenaceae. Common Names. The shrub is not related to mulberries but rather to verbena. This plant has adapted to a …

The southeastern quadrant of the United States, ranging from Texas to Maryland.
Common names are often deceiving.

CLIAM (Callicarpa americana) Scientific name: Callicarpa americana; Pronunciation: kallee-CAR-pa ameri-KON-a; Common name(s): American beautyberry, beautyberry, French mulberry; USDA hardiness zones: 6 through 10; Origin: native from Maryland to Florida and west through Tennessee, Arkansas, and Texas. Small lilac flowers appear in late summer, and for the next several months, the fruit, which grows in clusters around the stem, ripen to vibrant purple color. The American beautyberry is most commonly found in both dry and moist woods, thickets, and hammocks. American Beautyberry, sometimes called French Mulberry, Callicarpa americana is a US native deciduous shrub that grows wild from Maryland to Florida and west through Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas. At least 10 species of birds feed on the fruit, especially northern bobwhite.

The American beautyberry is but one of this charmer’s common names: French mulberry, Spanish mulberry, beautyberry, dwarf mulberry, sow berry and sour berry.

Callicarpa americana, commonly called beautyberry, is a loose open shrub valued for its spectacular fruits. American beautyberry has a coarse habit, large-toothed green to yellow-green oval-shaped leaves that turn chartreuse in the fall.

This plant has no children Legal Status.

Range/Geographical Distribution. Rank Scientific ... Callicarpa americana L. – American beautyberry Subordinate Taxa. American Beautyberry family is the family in which it has some properties in common with other plants in that family. Asian Beautyberry: Japanese beautyberry (Callicarpa japonica) and Chinese beautyberry (C. dichotoma and C. bodinieri) are a little more cold tolerant and generally smaler than the American types. American Beautyberry: Callicarpa americana is native to the southeastern United States.

In scientific classification of American Beautyberry, Family is a main factor.

American beautyberry; International Common Names. Click on a scientific name below to expand it in the PLANTS Classification Report.

Preferred Scientific Name. It's in the Vervain family (Verbenaceae). The plant's Family is Verbenaceae. In the wild, it can occur in a wide variety of sites, from dry to moist, from open to shady. Callicarpa americana.

Callicarpa americana, commonly called beautyberry, is a loose open shrub valued for its spectacular fruits. The relatively insignificant flowers develop into prolific bright violet to magenta berry-like drupes which encircle the stem. There are varieties with purple or white berries. Dover Publications. IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : The seeds of American beautyberry are an important food source for birds and small mammals. Uses: natural garden specimen; wildlife food; spring flowers American beautyberry; International Common Names. Scientific Name. The common name of this plant in Spanish is Americana beautyberry Árbol. Germany: Amerikanische Schoenfrucht; Italy: callicarpa d'America; EPPO code.

Scientific name is the name conforming to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN). Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center focused on protecting and preserving North America's native plants through native plant lists and image galleries, conservation, education, natural landscapes, seed collection - Millennium Seed Bank (MSB) Project, preserving and restoring native communities, spreading awareness on invasive species and gardening to attract wildlife. A jelly can be made from its ripe berries. CLIAM (Callicarpa americana)