1910 was an exciting year in astronomy. The Great January Comet of 1910, formally designated C/1910 A1 and often referred to as the Daylight Comet appeared in January 1910. It was already visible to the naked eye when it was first noticed, and many people independently "discovered" the comet. Given its brightness, Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) should be. On December 18, this comet was seen in daylight only 5 degrees from the sun. C/1910 A1 (Great January Comet) live position and data. Great Daylight Comet of 1910, Lowell Observatory. This comet was easily observed on January 17 only 4.5 degrees from the sun. But something unexpected happened first — the Great Daylight Comet of 1910, so-called because it could be seen … Continue reading "Great Daylight Comet of January 1910" GREAT JANUARY COMET OF 1910: The first people to see this comet-then already of first magnitude-were workmen at the Transvaal Premier Diamond Mine in … This page shows Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) location and other relevant astronomical data in real time. Estimated Magnitude (JPL) - Observed Magnitude (COBS) - The current visual magnitude of Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) is -100.00. At its brightest, it outshone the planet Venus, and was possibly the brightest comet of the 20th century. Great Comet of 1910 Post #1 by Anthony_B_Russo10 » 14.08.2018, 03:14 This adds the comet C1910 A 1 that made a close approach to Earth in January 1910, four months before 1P/Halley's approach in 1910. Halley’s Comet was expected to become visible in May of that year after an absence of 75 years, and there was great anticipation of that event, both scientifically and culturally. unknown. It was already visible to the naked eyewhen it was first noticed, and many people independently "discovered" the comet. The Great January Comet of 1910, formally designated C/1910 A1 and often referred to as the Daylight Comet appeared in January 1910. Then, without warning, a truly special event occurred; a bright comet appeared suddenly out of nowhere. Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) is currently in the constellation of Aquila. Halley’s Comet was expected to become visible in May of that year after an absence of 75 years, and there was great anticipation of that event, both scientifically and culturally. Astronomers Carl Lampland and Vesto Slipher captured this view of the Great Daylight Comet (also designated C/1910a) on January 28, 1910 — 11 days it reached perihelion just 12 million miles from the Sun. The current Right Ascension of Comet Great January Comet of 1910 (C/1910 A1) is 20h 05m 15s and the Declination is +06° 55’ 30” (topocentric coordinates computed for the selected location: Greenwich, United Kingdom ). The Great January Comet of 1910, formally designated C/1910 A1and often referred to as the Daylight Comet[2]appeared in January 1910.