If it goes up 10 percent it will be worth $110. Example; You buy 100 shares for $100 per share and it cost you $10 to buy and $10 to sell. You can divide this 10,020 / 100 = $100.20 per share is what it actually cost you. I think you are confused maybe about the definition of the intrinsic value. The first stock went up by (10 -5 ) / 5 * 100 = 100 percent, while the second stock increased by (18 - 10) / 10 * 100 = 80 percent. If the stock then goes up 20%-25% from the ideal buy point, your profit would be 18% to 23%.

However, it's still weeks away from the time the company is expected to announce its dividend payment, so an investor who just found the stock uses previous dividend payments to calculate the yield. If you think that something does not make sense in the above then I agree with you.

Being able to say, "The Dow was up 100 points," instead of, "The stocks of the companies in the Dow gained $784,356,102.001, give or take a few thousandths," tended to be much less unwieldy. So, as you can see. Your Purchase price is 100x$100= $10,000 plus you add $20 for your buy and sell and your total purchase price is $10,020! A drop of 10 percent puts the investment at $90. If, your $100 per share stock goes up to .25 cents you made a profit of .5 …
The result is a 21.43 percent gain. You enter 280 in the Old Stock Price box and 340 in the New Stock Price box. The intrinsic value is the total value of he company considering all aspects. Returning to the example from earlier, let's assume that a recession has hit, and the price of the stock dropped from $10 to $5. In order to find the net gain or loss of your stock holding, you will have to determine the difference between what you paid for it and ultimately what you sold it for on a percentage basis. See the chart below for an example of how this works. So let's say you bought 2% above the ideal buy point.

Example: Bought Apple stock at $280 and new price is $340.

If a stock goes up 100 percent, it's doubled in value. The 10 percent is based on the $100 start. Increased Percent of Profits: I get to keep 100% of the profits. Owning stock does not allow you any control over what the company does or how it treats its customers. As the stock price plummeted, that $0.40 annual dividend jumped …