The state courts continued to find for the state and Muller appealed to the United States Supreme Court. ... Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 (1908) Muller v. Oregon. Muller v. Oregon - Case Brief - Quimbee. Women were provided by state mandate lesser work-hours than allotted to men. Muller v. Oregon (1908) Muller v. Oregon is the United States Supreme Court case upholding the constitutionality of a state law in Oregon limiting to ten the hours women could work in laundries or mechanical establishments or factories.
Argued January 15, 1908. An Oregon state law restricted a women’s working hours to ten per day. Oregon a landmark decision in United States Supreme Court history, as it relates to both sex discrimination and labor laws. As said by Chief Justice Wolverton, in First Nat. Curt Muller (defendant), owner of a laundry business, was convicted of violating the statute after he made a female employee work more than ten hours in one day. Mr. Curt Muller was convicted of violating the statute when he required a woman to work over the limit at his laundry facility.
Oregon enacted a law that limited women to ten hours of work in factories and laundries. Legacy of the Case. The Oregon law stated that women could not work more than ten hours a day in jobs associated with factories and laundries. Muller v. Oregon, 208 U. S. 412 (1908) The statute before the Court in Muller was an Oregon law passed in 1903 that set a maximum of ten hours a day for women employed in factories and laundries. The owner of a laundry business, Curt Muller, was fined $10 when he violated the law. 873, 874, after a review of the various statutes of the state upon the subject: Muller appealed the conviction. Muller v.   Oregon was a Supreme Court case decided on February 24, 1908. His brief for the 1908 Supreme Court case Muller v. Oregon, was a 113 page document with statistical data, laws, journal articles, and other material. A summary and case brief of Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 (1908), including the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, key terms, and concurrences and dissents. Facts. Bank v. Leonard, 36 Or. Muller v. Oregon Case Brief - Rule of Law: The general right to contract is protected by the United States Constitution (Constitution), but this liberty is not absolute. Muller v. Oregon, one of the most important U.S. Supreme Court cases of the Progressive Era, upheld an Oregon law limiting the workday for female wage earners to ten hours. Muller v. Oregon Case Brief. Muller appealed the conviction. Oregon enacted a law that limited women to ten hours of work in factories and laundries. The owner of a laundry business, Curt Muller, was fined $10 when he violated the law. The state supreme court upheld the law’s constitutionality. Quimbee.com In 1903, the State of Oregon (plaintiff) passed a law that limited the working hours of female employees to no more than ten per day. No. Despite the small penalty, Muller appealed the conviction. The posed question was whether women's liberty to negotiate a contract with an employer should be equal to a man's. The case upheld Oregon state restrictions on the working hours of women as justified by the special state interest in protecting women's health., 10-hour work day for women laundry workers on health and community concerns Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 (1908), was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court. Statement of the facts: Oregon’s legislature passed a law which limited the working hours of female employees. What's largely forgotten are the early feminists who hailed the 1923 decision as a heartening victory. About This Quiz & Worksheet. Muller v. State of Oregon, U.S. Supreme Court case decided in 1908 that, although it appeared to promote the health and welfare of female workers, in fact led to additional protective legislation that was detrimental to equality in the workplace for years to come. The case established a precedent in 1908 to expand the reach of state activity into the realm of protective labor legislation.